Archives for yo-yo dieting

Changing your mind

It’s often said that if you eat less sugar for a while your taste buds will change, so that the sugary stuff you used to love becomes much too sweet. But it's not the taste buds themselves that change; what changes is your brain’s interpretation of the messages coming from the taste buds.
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Set Point

This week a TV documentary here in the UK was promoting the Set Point Theory, so I thought I’d re-visit this idea as you might be interested. The Set Point Theory says that your body can learn to prefer a higher weight, so that your Set Point becomes raised to a level that’s overweight or even obese.
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Food Addiction?

The only argument I’ve seen against describing overeating as ‘addiction’ was that it cannot be precisely defined. Where does it begin and end: before dessert or after? One square of dark chocolate or 50? Or somewhere in between? But exactly the same problem applies to smoking, as there are those who only smoke one or two a year. There are few such smokers, but there’s still no absolute marker between not addicted and addicted.
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Q&A: When diets work

I read your book because a friend of mine told me it helped her the last time she was doing her slimming club. I don’t want to give up dieting because it works well for me. Once I’ve started I slip into that mentality really well and it works like a charm. I don’t struggle with it, I don’t have cravings or feel the urge to snack on pastries and chocolate (like I do when I’m not dieting).
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Q&A: Group power

The Question: Several years ago, I decided I had had enough of feeling unhappy with my weight, and joined a slimming group. This for me was a success in several respects: I enjoyed going to the weekly meetings, increased my exercise dramatically, followed the dietary rules pretty strictly, and lost a stone over a period of 16 weeks, to become the slimmest I ever had been in my adult life, which I enjoyed.
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Q&A: Who do you love?

The Question: Your point about not making a big deal about losing weight, and trying to avoid conversations about it, makes a lot of sense to me! I actually find it a bit offensive when people comment on my body and weight. As I see it, the praise for weight loss is really a critique of the heavier version of me. For a while my weight had been going up, but lately - finally - I have some balance with my eating and my clothes feel a bit looser. I am beginning to worry about when the comments will start.
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Q&A: Weight loss and self-esteem

The Question: There’s a lot in your book that I already have and will continue to find extremely useful. However, I think I see a chink in the amour for me. Although I like the idea of making self-esteem independent of my body image, I don’t think I could do that. I have suffered (and I do mean suffered) from low self-esteem all my life and those times when I felt I looked most attractive (i.e. when I had lost enough weight) were always the times I felt best about myself, more confident, relaxed and, especially, happy.
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Q&A: Becoming a fire fighter

The Question: My doctor has advised me to lose weight as she says I'm close to becoming diabetic. I have failed at dieting all my life, so I bought your book and have managed to eat considerably less for the last three months. However, I'm not losing nearly as much weight as I think I should be.
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Q&A: Dear Jenni

The Question: I don't know if you would have seen the Jenni Murray article about why she's getting a gastric band (basically because of years of the diet prison) but after seeing how gastric bands haven't worked for people like Anne Diamond or Vanessa Feltz, I was incensed enough to contact Women's Hour and suggest Jenni attends one of your seminars.
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Not So Fast

A few weeks ago I bought a copy of the bestseller The Fast Diet to see what it was all about. In case you don't know, it was published as a result of the interest in the BBC Horizon documentary about Intermittent Fasting (IF), written by the programme presenter Dr Michael Mosley and journalist Mimi Spencer. I believe that fasting is beneficial, but not necessarily advisable for everyone, so I wanted to read the book to discover new information and research, but also I was curious to see if it contained any words of caution.
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