Archives for sugar

Changing your mind

It’s often said that if you eat less sugar for a while your taste buds will change, so that the sugary stuff you used to love becomes much too sweet. But it's not the taste buds themselves that change; what changes is your brain’s interpretation of the messages coming from the taste buds.
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Q&A: Insulin resistance

The Question: Can you help me with a weight problem? I’ve used your book EATING LESS for some time and already succeeded with impressive (to me!) changes in what I’m eating, including cutting out sweet things after my evening meal and cutting way down on snacks.
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Q&A: Food on trial

The Question: From reading your book and blogs, it seems you promote a low carb diet. So sometimes I think, "Oh, I can't eat that; that's not Gillian's program." How do I let go of that and not treat this as another prohibitive program? And, do you promote a low carb diet?
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A Little Bit More

I wonder if this is something that happens to you from time to time. A particular item of “food” attracts your attention; you want to eat it and it’s available to you. I write it as “food” because it’s not food; it’s just something that will delight your senses for a few moments, distract and entertain you.
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It is a Pleasure

Just like many others, I own way too many clothes that I don't actually wear. It's not because I buy so many, it's that I'm very reluctant to throw them away. I keep a dress I bought in the 1980s, and guess I’ve worn it twice. It's way too big for me now, as I've steadily lost weight over the past years, and the style of it wouldn't suit resizing.
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Chocoholism

Are you a chocoholic? Is chocolate good for you? And is chocolate addictive? It’s possible you’ve answered a resounding yes to all three. To look first of all at its addictiveness, here's a study from the University of London's Division of Mental Health.
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Q&A: Can’t Lose

Do you know if there are people who will never lose weight no matter what they do and how much they starve themselves? I ask this because people do talk about this and I do think I’m one of them. I’m not yo-yo dieting because I just don’t lose the weight in the first place, and I’ve been struggling with this for more years than I care to say.
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Ancient Brain in a Modern World

One thing I hear often, and am always a little surprised by, is that my clients think they’re the only ones who struggle so much with food. Are you one of those who see your overeating as a personal shortcoming, a private torment, unique to you? Surely it's self-evident that the overwhelming majority of the so-called developed world is overeating, given the problem of weight in our culture and the massive (pun intended!) dieting industry.
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Ain’t Necessarily So

You may already be on board with the idea that the way to change your behaviour with food is to change the way you think about food. This means challenging beliefs you hold, perhaps long-held assumptions you’ve never been called upon to question, and perhaps not even fully recognise. Your own pattern of beliefs will be unique to you, and some could evaporate quite effortlessly. The most entrenched attitudes, though, tend to be those held by the entire culture. This is the sort of concept that ‘everybody knows’, which makes it tough to question.
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Desire, Craving and Preference

Whenever you eat any food you don’t really need, what you’ve done is to satisfy your addictive desire to eat. No blame intended here; it’s just that when we name it we can make progress. As you may know from my books, taking control of overeating is the process of releasing and healing this desire for excess food. To some extent, it’s likely you’ll always satisfy some addictive desire. But if you can satisfy it less often (maybe a lot less often), that would deliver the results you want. Assuming, of course, it lasts long term.
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