Archives for addiction

Addiction In Sight

There was a programme on BBC Radio 4 a while ago called Constant Craving. It attempted to answer the controversial question of whether food addiction exists, and it reminded me of that fable about four blind men who discover an elephant. Each of them grabs hold of a different part, and gives his description of the animal.  
Read More

Keep it in mind

It can be so helpful to know that something you feel in your body isn’t necessarily caused by anything physical; it could be caused by your mind. Addiction is almost always explained entirely in terms of physical effects. It is true that the things we become addicted to, including sugar, all have the potential to become addictions because of the effect they have on our biochemistry, and especially that of our brains.
Read More

Everything in moderation: 2

In our last blog we looked at the standard advice to eat everything in moderation, and why it might be worth your while to question assumptions you make about what really is moderate. Consider, for example, that the average sugar intake in England, per person per year, was 5lb (4kg) in the 1800s and is now around 175lbs (85kg).
Read More

Everything in moderation: 1

Any addiction is surrounded by particular ways of thinking. So much gets said about biochemistry - that overeating is driven by physical imbalances such as insulin, leptin, dopamine, etc, etc. I don't doubt they’re involved, but it’s best to address the beliefs that support the addiction first. Then you get to change the behaviour – what you’re eating – and the rest often sorts itself out as a result of you making better food choices.
Read More

Changing your mind

It’s often said that if you eat less sugar for a while your taste buds will change, so that the sugary stuff you used to love becomes much too sweet. But it's not the taste buds themselves that change; what changes is your brain’s interpretation of the messages coming from the taste buds.
Read More

Food addiction in our culture

Food addiction, just like any addiction, grows from roots in so many different places, from the chemistry of our bodies to our social traditions, from private self-regard to national legislation. All of them can exert an influence on those moments when your addictive desire has appeared and demands to be satisfied.
Read More

GUEST POST: “Eating Less” and Children

by Rosie. While attending Gillian’s EATING LESS ONLINE webinars earlier this year, there was some discussion in our Facebook group about our children’s eating, and the messages we send out to them. The webinars had helped us become more aware of these issues in ourselves and, especially for those of us with young children, we inevitably started thinking about what we might be creating for them.
Read More

Q&A: Insulin resistance

The Question: Can you help me with a weight problem? I’ve used your book EATING LESS for some time and already succeeded with impressive (to me!) changes in what I’m eating, including cutting out sweet things after my evening meal and cutting way down on snacks.
Read More

Q&A: Food on trial

The Question: From reading your book and blogs, it seems you promote a low carb diet. So sometimes I think, "Oh, I can't eat that; that's not Gillian's program." How do I let go of that and not treat this as another prohibitive program? And, do you promote a low carb diet?
Read More

Food Addiction?

The only argument I’ve seen against describing overeating as ‘addiction’ was that it cannot be precisely defined. Where does it begin and end: before dessert or after? One square of dark chocolate or 50? Or somewhere in between? But exactly the same problem applies to smoking, as there are those who only smoke one or two a year. There are few such smokers, but there’s still no absolute marker between not addicted and addicted.
Read More