Q&A: Food on trial

 

The Question:

From reading your book and blogs, it seems you promote a low carb diet. So sometimes I think, “Oh, I can’t eat that; that’s not Gillian’s program.” How do I let go of that and not treat this as another prohibitive program? And, do you promote a low carb diet?

 

My Answer:

What a great question. First of all, what I promote is a way of thinking that will enable anyone to eat less regardless of the advice they’re following, and even those who are following no particular dietary advice at all. And, crucially, they will be able to eat less in a way they can maintain over time.

An important part of that way of thinking is what I refer to as ‘owning choice’. This means that eating less of anything doesn’t feel like a restriction or prohibition, because any prohibition about any kinds or amounts of food will keep you in that cycle of compliance and rebellion. No matter what they are, you follow rules for a while, and then you break them and you’re overeating again.

You could have your hands on the best dietary advice ever, but it’s not going to be much use if you can’t follow it and integrate it into your life. Many people I see have developed an ambivalent – and perhaps even hostile – reaction to nutritional advice because it’s been impossible for them to implement it in the first place, or to stay with it over time.

Personally, I find that Low-Carbohydrate-High-Fat (LCHF) works well for me, so I am biased in that regard. A great many people become more intolerant of carbohydrates as they get older, and I’ve certainly found that to be the case for me. Many of those who come to my seminars are eating high-fat and high-carb, and that’s said to be the worst thing you can do for your health and your weight.

 

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Comments

  1. Amanda

    Thank you for another insightful article. As someone who still struggles not only with eating too much, but also with what on earth to eat, this is useful information. LCHF is something I feel good eating and your post has helped me to realise that it’s probably because it’s right for me. Now I can start to see it as something positive and tailored to my individual needs, not a rule to follow.

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